Where to Build Your Veggie Garden

By Sarah Finazzo

March 26, 2021

Last year veggie gardens sprung up left and right when people were home more. This year with more time and experience, veggie gardens can be organized more thoughtfully! When it comes to planning, one of the most important factors is placement within your yard. Does your garden get the right sun? Water? Drainage? Before you get started it’s important to consider these factors. Tilly put together some helpful tips on where to build your veggie garden! 

Where to Build Your Veggie Garden

Plan It

Think about it before you jump in! This way you can see the entire picture and it doesn’t matter how many phases it takes to implement, it will make sense in the end. Think about crop rotation – try not to plant the same things in the same location every year as this will reduce the change of systemic problems in the soils. 

 

Sun 

It’s important that the location you chose has at least six hours of sunlight daily, 8 hours if you’re growing sun lovers like tomatoes and peppers.

 

Drainage

If your garden is going into the ground, it’s very important to make sure you have good drainage so water doesn’t pool and saturate your plants or foster damp conditions. 

 

Air Flow

Make sure you have good air circulation. Other than a midnight peter rabbit attack, this biggest threat to a veggie garden might be molds and funguses. Keep these at bay by making sure there is adequate airflow to dry wet leaves and soil between waterings. 

 

Level Ground

Choose a level location with loose, rich soil! Or get busy and make it that way. 

 

Water Access

Since you will need to water your growing garden, it’s important to make sure you have access to a water source, such as a garden hose. We advocate drip water systems wherever possible to keep water off leaves and further prevent disease.

If you liked this article on where to build your veggie garden, you may also like our post on Sustainable Gardening or How to Attract Pollinators!

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We have found the Tilly process to be most successful on properties less than an acre.

A major part of remote design is understanding a property’s existing conditions and limitations. To do this we generally use the primary structure (usually the house) as the main point of reference. The greater distances are from from the house the less successful we are at understanding your property. No matter what the size of your property, the more information you can provide us, the better. Don’t be shy with the pictures! And please send along any and all architectural or property plan documents you can.

Still have questions? Contact us!